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Media Bits and Bytes - January 8, 2019

Tech Workers Stand Up; TV Goes Global; Biz Adapts; China's History Censored; The End of Women's Mags; NBC News Confidential; German Hacker Nabbed

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This is the year American television went global, Illustration by Michael Waraksa / For the Los Angeles Times

 

The Year Tech Workers Realized They Were Workers

By Nitasha Tiku
December 24, 2018
Wired

When employees felt that their products were damaging the world and that management wouldn't listen, they went public with their protests.

 

2018 and the Globalization of Television

By Robert Lloyd
December 25, 2018
Los Angeles Times

Television has never been more cosmopolitan and international.

 

Changing How Businesses Use Social Media in 2019

By Ryan Holmes
January 7, 2019
Financial Post

How media companies plan to adapt in 2019.

 

Learning China’s Forbidden History, So They Can Censor It

By Li Yuan
January 2, 2019
New York Times

Thousands of low-wage workers in “censorship factories” trawl the online world for forbidden content.

Women’s Magazines Are Dying. Will We Miss Them?

By Lavanya Ramanathan
January 1, 2019
Washington Post

What women’s magazines once delivered can now be found many places online.

NBC News Veteran Warns of 'Trump Circus'

By Brian Stelter
January 2, 2019
CNN

William Arkin's 2,228-word memo to his colleagues bluntly expresses his displeasure with the "Trump circus," US foreign policy failures, and the state of television news.

 

German Hacker Behind Massive Political Data Leak Identified

By Jefferson Chase
January 8, 2019
Deutsche Welle

Authorities say a 20-year-old, acting alone, was behind a huge leak of personal data concerning leading politicians and celebrities. Questions remain about German cybersecurity.