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Biden's Executive Order to Boost Food Aid Greeted

Andrea Germanos Common Dreams
With one of five American families living with food insecurity, the new executive orders are greeted as 'the most significant anti-hunger actions in modern times.'

Coming Soon: Bipartisan Deficit Hawks Calling for Austerity

Ari Rabin-Havt Jacobin
people waiting in line Right now, government money is flowing. But soon the self-appointed guardians of “fiscal responsibility” will call for cuts to Social Security, Medicare, and SNAP, while leaving the defense budget and large tax breaks for the wealthy intact.

Trump on America’s Hungry: Let Them Eat “Harvest Boxes”

Matthew Gritter Rural America - In These Times
The latest budget proposal calls for reducing Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) outlays by $200 billion over the next decade and replacing about half of the aid delivered through this mainstay of the American safety net with what it’s calling “harvest boxes” of nonperishable items like pasta, canned meat and peanut butter. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue says this new approach would cut costs and give states, which administer the SNAP program, “flexibility.”

President’s New Budget. Stark Vision of GOP Reality. Attention Must Be Paid; Here are the Proposed Cuts; Huge Increase for Pentagon

Robert Greenstein; Ryan Koronowski; Brett Samuels; Fred Kaplan
The President's budget is a reflection of the administration's priorities. And this administration and their GOP co-horts in Congress want to slash over a trillion dollars with cuts to programs for some of the nation's most vulnerable. A massive increase in the military budget and war preparations comes at the expense of slashing all kinds of social programs.

How Big Banks Are Cashing In On Food Stamps

Virginia Eubanks The American Prospect
When the new farm bill is enacted, many of America’s hardest working families will experience cuts in services and have trouble putting food on their family’s table. But there will be major gains for an industry that most Americans might not expect: banking.

labor

The Insanity of Our Food Policy

Joseph Stiglitz The New York Times- Opinionator
FARM subsidies were much more sensible when they began eight decades ago, in 1933, at a time when more than 40 percent of Americans lived in rural areas. Farm incomes had fallen by about a half in the first three years of the Great Depression. In that context, the subsidies were an anti-poverty program. Now, though, the farm subsidies serve a quite different purpose.

This Week in Poverty: Confronting Congressional Hunger Games

Greg Kaufmann The Nation
Why is it so easy for both parties to play games with the lives of the one in seven Americans—including nearly one in three children—who are in need of food assistance? And what can be done to change this dynamic?
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