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N.S.A. Triples Collection of Data From U.S. Phone Companies

Charlie Savage New York Times
The large and growing volume of data gathered shows that the N.S.A. continues to collect significant amounts of information about Americans’ phone and text messages after changes made by Congress in a 2015 law, the USA Freedom Act.

New Snowden Documents Reveal Secret Memos Expanding Spying

Julia Angwin, Jeff Larson, Charlie Savage, Henrik Moltke ProPublica
Without public notice or debate, the Obama administration has expanded the National Security Agency’s warrantless surveillance of Americans’ international Internet traffic. The NSA’s activities run “smack into law enforcement land,” said Jonathan Mayer, a cybersecurity scholar. “That’s a major policy decision about how to structure cybersecurity in the U.S. and not a conversation that has been had in public.”

The Sun Must Set on Mass Surveillance

Timothy Karr Huffington Post
Authorization for the federal government's bulk collection of phone records is set to expire on June 1. Senators will return to Capitol Hill on Sunday afternoon -- and unless they extend it, authorization will "sunset" at midnight ET on June 1. The public must speak out now to close this chapter on mass surveillance.

Tidbits - May 28, 2015 - California Oil Spill; Baltimore; Bernie; Waco White Riot; Freedom for Oscar López Rivera New York - May 30; and more...

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Reader Comments - California Oil Spill; Baltimore; Bernie Sanders Campaign; Waco and White Riot; Freedom for Oscar López Rivera - New York March May 30; Why Libraries Matter; Cold War Modernist; Announcements - Last Cold War Spycase - film showing - Washington - June 7; National Healthcare Strategy Conference in Chicago Oct. 30 Today in History - The Paris Commune - 144 Years Ago; Today Marks 5 Years in Confinement for Chelsea Manning

Why NSA Surveillance is Worse than You've Ever Imagined

James Bamford Reuters
Despite the volume of revelations, much of the public remains largely unaware of the true extent of the NSA's vast, highly aggressive and legally questionable surveillance activities. Given the vast amount of revelations about NSA abuses, it is somewhat surprising that just slightly more than a majority of Americans seem concerned about government surveillance. Which leads to the question of why?

As Encryption Spreads, U.S. Grapples With Clash Between Privacy, Security

Ellen Nakashima and Barton Gellman Washington Post
“I don’t believe that law enforcement has an absolute right to gain access to every way in which two people may choose to communicate,” said Marc Zwillinger, “And I don’t think our Founding Fathers would think so, either. The fact that the Constitution offers a process for obtaining a search warrant where there is probable cause is not support for the notion that it should be illegal to make an unbreakable lock. These are two distinct concepts.”

John Oliver: Government Surveillance

There are very few government checks on what America’s sweeping surveillance programs are capable of doing. John Oliver sits down with Edward Snowden to discuss the NSA, the balance between privacy and security, and dick-pics.

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