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North Carolina Orders New House Race

Sam Levine Huffington Post
The state elections board voted unanimously after seeing evidence that an operative working for Republican Mark Harris illegally collected absentee ballots.

How the Anti-Trump Resistance Is Organizing Its Outrage

Charlotte Alter Time
If Democrats retake one or both houses of Congress in November, it will be largely because of this emerging national network of progressive organizers. But winning the midterms is just the first step in a movement designed to rebuild and transform.

Arrested, Jailed and Charged With a Felony. For Voting.

Jack Healy New York Times
Mr. Sellars, 44, is one of a dozen people in Alamance County in North Carolina who are being prosecuted for voting in the 2016 presidential election while on probation or parole for a felony.

North Carolina, May 16: Our Strength, Our Task, Our Future

North Carolina Association of Educators Organize 2020 Caucus Organizing Upgrade
outline of North Carolina with heart and 2020 This piece was developed by Organize 2020, the social and racial justice caucus of the North Carolina Association of Educators (NCAE), written in advance of the massive May 16th teachers mobilizations in North Carolina. Keep an eye out for future reflection pieces from local organizers.

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How Organizers in Rural North Carolina Plan To Build Working-Class Power in 2018

Sarah Jaffe In These Times
Welcome to Interviews for Resistance. We’re now nearly one year into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk with organizers, agitators, and educators, not only about how to resist, but how to build a better world.

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When Deregulation is Deadly

Bryant Simon The Gender Policy Report
On September 3, 1991, the Imperial Food Products plant in Hamlet, North Carolina burst into flames. Twenty-five people died, trapped behind the locked doors of the red-brick factory. Most of the victims were women; many were women of color, most were single moms. Another sixty people were injured, and the blast left more than fifty children orphaned. Local officials called the fire an accident, but the women and men who worked at Imperial had been made vulnerable by the factory’s owners as well as public policy.
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