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Since When Does Netflix Take Marching Orders From Saudi Arabia?

Dean Obeidallah The Daily Beast
Netflix has the power to reject attempts to silence those who use comedy to speak truth to power. Anything less makes the company complicit in Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman's plan to stifle those who criticize him.

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‘Collateral’ Is Essential—and Timely—TV

Alison Herman The Ringer
The British miniseries Collateral, which premiered on Netflix last Friday after an initial run on BBC Two last month, is to a post-Brexit United Kingdom what recent seasons of American Horror Story: Cult, American Crime, and even Broad City are to a post-Trump United States.

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‘Babylon Berlin’ Is A Big-Budget Cautionary Tale Against Bigotry and Excess

Tess Cagle Daily Dot
Aside from the sheer entertainment of the series, Babylon Berlin offers its new American audience the warning it needs in 2018. As the plot progresses, Rath must choose between his morals and nationalism—something Americans struggle with often in the 21st century. But Babylon Berlin shows us how a progressive nation can crumble when it allows bigotry and intolerance to fester.

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The Epic Grift of Dirty Money

Sophie Gilbert The Atlantic
Netflix’s new six-part documentary series is an enthralling take on cons and corporate malfeasance, from money laundering for cartels to the Trump Organization.

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We Asked Financial Advisers: How Realistic is Netflix’s New Show, ‘Ozark’?

Tom Teodorczuk MarketWatch
Netflix's Ozark brings capitalism's corrosive effects to middle america through the lens of a financial adviser and money laundering. Right from the opening monologue narrated by star Jason Bateman, Netflix’s new drama “Ozark” makes clear it doesn’t just want to depict a financial adviser up to his neck in danger. It’s out to convey profound truths about money.

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Why Are The Guards On Strike On 'Orange Is The New Black'? Privatization Got To Them

Mariella Mosthof Romper
One of Orange Is the New Black's greatest accomplishments in Season 3 was exploring the Litchfield guards' inner lives just as deeply, richly, and with just as much complexity as it has the inmates' lives. Rather than set up a false dichotomy where the prisoners are the "good guys" who just got themselves into a bad situation and the guards are the monsters, Season 3 shows us that the guards have it tough, too. So tough, in fact, that they decide to unionize.
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