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Information is power. Our mission at Portside is to seek out and to provide information that empowers you -- that empowers the left. Every day we search hundreds of sources to connect you with the most interesting, striking and useful material. Just once a year we appeal to you to contribute to make it possible to continue this work. Please help.

Archives

For posts before June 2012, please follow these links to our archives.

Review of "The Favourite": The British Royals Have Always Been Scum

Eileen Jones Jacobin
Despite generations of imperial murder, torture, rape, and plunder, the British ruling class still gets brown-nose treatment in historical depictions. Not so in The Favourite where they are shown as the disgusting creatures they were and still are.

How does it end?

Marge Piercy Monthly Review
The award-winning poet Marge Piercy decries America’s refugee policies that would make an earlier poet, Emma Lazarus, weep.

The Soaring Writer Who Landed on His Feet

Michael Hirsch New Politics
A crime novel with a difference, this one centers on murders in a vacation town that appear to take on racial significance going back to World War Two and a segregated, elite military command.

John Woman

Steve Nathans-Kelly New York Journal of Books
Mosley’s new book, writes reviewer Nathans-Kelly, "is as provocative and morally instructive as anything he’s written.”

Confused by Nutrition Research? Sloppy Science May Be to Blame

Jane E. Brody New York Times
In the book, “Unsavory Truth: How Food Companies Skew the Science of What We Eat,” Marion Nestle, emerita professor of nutrition at New York University, discusses how the unstated goal of most company-sponsored studies is to increase the bottom line.

Oh, Say Can You See

Jacqueline Allen Trimble Poet Lore
Alabama poet Jacqueline Allen Trimble points to the slave origins of the Star Spangled Banner linking the song to today’s Black Lives Matter and other protests.

Dialectics of Christmas

Fred Halliday Verso Blog
A vintage holiday treat from the UK's Black Dwarf, Christmas 1969*, where the author analyzes the dialectic of Christmas in which the desire for happiness is marshaled into a tool of subjection (and alcoholic oblivion).